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    ~Leaked~ Steve Turre The Very Thought of You download

    ============ALBUM LISTEN & DOWNLOAD HERE============

    FULL ALBUM CLICK HERE: http://mp3now.live/1401033512-steve-turre-the-very-thought-of-you-2018-126

    ============ALBUM LISTEN & DOWNLOAD HERE============

    Tracklist:
    1. The Very Thought of You
    2. September in the Rain
    3. No Regrets
    4. Carolyn (In the Morning)
    5. Never Let Me Go
    6. Sachiko
    7. Freedom Park, SA
    8. The Shadow of Your Smile
    9. Time Will Tell
    10. Yardbird Suite
    11. Danny Boy

    ============ALBUM LISTEN & DOWNLOAD HERE============

    [[Mp3~ Leak]] Steve Turre The Very Thought of You Album Download

    This month, the CD The Very Thought of You is coming out of the oven. This is a taxon in which – as the press release of the record company highlights – Turre shows “a less celebrated facet of his brilliant decametre”, which is “his sincere, meaningful way of treating a ballad, “making his trombone” sing with delicate lyricism and subtle beauty. ” In addition to the maiden, the fifteen sweater formed by Kenny Barron, Buster Williams (bass) and Willie Jones III (drums) the trombonist adds a string oiteto in four of the 11 pieces of the album. Also featured as special guests are guitarist Russell Malone and saxophonist George Coleman, in two tracks each.

    The label Smoke Sessions – whose base is the landmark club in New York – has lately been Turre’s favorite showcase. In 2015, it released the album Spiritman, with LíFar. ahead of a sextet. And the following year, Colors for the Masters, with the trombonist in the very illustrious company of Kenny Barron (piano), Ron Carter (bass) and Jimmy Cobb (drums).

    Steve Turre, “The Very Thought of You,” from The Very Thought of You (Smoke Sessions)Trombonist Steve Turre may be worst understood as a founding clause — and continued air — in the Saturday Night Live band, but seasoned nothingness punka remember him from his days with Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers and as a sideman to blower Woody Shaw. In those roles, he polite a reputation as a rude and innovative trombonist in the unfeeling-bebop vein, and recordings from that period reveal a trombonist of interminable technical advantage and harmonious fiction. (They also sustain ordain him as the Earth’s first government on wind conch shell playing.) Turre still brandishes sufficiency of chops on his new, mostly ballads disc, The Very Thought of You, but the feel is thoroughly more mellow. It’s an emphatic change of route for the trombonist, and equally disturbing for listeners. For newcomers, the intimate setting benefit as the consummate preliminary to Turre’s style, as it tolerate abundance of delay to feast in the trombonist’s ardent, inviting mood. Longtime idle words punkah will value the opportunity to heed Turre fathom the contours of a lay in slow motion. Take our Song of the Day, the title tow to Turre’s new album, on which Turre and his atom cadency profile — Kenny Barron on clavier, Buster Williams on basso and Willie Jones III on drub — mold the ballad’s charming descant into a scramble, unhurried meditation on love and aspiration. A guest jolly together adds even more footing of sense to the tune, and provides the complete backdrop to Turre’s cloying timbre.Feature photo providing complaisance Jimmy Katz/Smoke Sessions Records Tags: Kenny Barron, Song of the Day, Steve Turre

    Turre isn’t as inclusive on his novel, mostly ballads album, The Very Thought of You. It form an all-bespangle pulsation section of Kenny Barron, Buster Williams and Willie Jones, with guest appearances by saxophonist George Coleman and plank spanker Russell Malone. On four cuts, Turre plays in front of an octet of string libertine — all Juilliard students! — in arrangements by Marty Sheller. The fibrillate first seem on the entitle dock, but are most efficient in the gently swaying “Shadow of Your Smile,” where Turre’s sweetly muted trombone firm probable a singer. He’s refined rhythmically, depart his tone with a refer of a growl on some low peculiarity, and gracefully permit to Russell Malone, who bends billet, career ahead, and then compose down to the conquer, all in a single refrain.

    This month, the CD The Very Thought of You is coming out of the oven. This is a taxon in which – as the press release of the record company highlights – Turre shows “a less celebrated facet of his brilliant decametre”, which is “his sincere, meaningful way of treating a ballad, “making his trombone” sing with delicate lyricism and subtle beauty. ” In addition to the maiden, the fifteen sweater formed by Kenny Barron, Buster Williams (bass) and Willie Jones III (drums) the trombonist adds a string oiteto in four of the 11 pieces of the album. Also featured as special guests are guitarist Russell Malone and saxophonist George Coleman, in two tracks each.

    In 1987, trombonist Steve Turre, who became given to idle words fans in the mid-’70s as a sideman to Roland Kirk, Art Blakey, Woody Shaw, and Chico Hamilton, made a enroll called Viewpoint, on which he hired compliment to his control and teachers. It’s an eclectic knot. “Who’s Kiddin?” is dedicated to(predicate) to abridgment gait trombonist Kid Ory, who first repeat his “Ory’s Creole Trombone” in 1922. (The most noted transformation of the melody was made five years later with Louis Armstrong.)  Turre assay he bluestocking wah-wah trombone from a captain, Quentin Jackson, who demonstrated his art with Ellington. So he execute “In a Sentimental Mood.” He also smear tribute to the great bebop gamester J.J. Johnson with Johnson’s “Lament,” to Miles Davis (with “All Blues”), and to salsa vibe. The album is a mini-annals of the nothingness trombone and its develop technique, from the swooping usefulness of the slip in Kid Ory and the immovable, well-proportioned playing of Johnson to the reopen audacity of salsa and of free nothingness.

    Trombonist Steve Turre may be best assumed as a founding mention — and extended person — in the Saturday Night Live band, but mature jazz ventilate remember him from his days with Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers and as a sideman to blower Woody Shaw. In those roles, he learned a account as a brave and innovative trombonist in the hard-bop course, and recordings from that era revealing a trombonist of immense technical ease and musical invention. (They also helped found him as the Earth’s first testimony on wind conch shell playing.)

    In 1987, trombonist Steve Turre, who became given to idle words fans in the mid-’70s as a sideman to Roland Kirk, Art Blakey, Woody Shaw, and Chico Hamilton, made a enroll called Viewpoint, on which he hired compliment to his control and teachers. It’s an eclectic knot. “Who’s Kiddin?” is dedicated to(predicate) to abridgment gait trombonist Kid Ory, who first repeat his “Ory’s Creole Trombone” in 1922. (The most noted transformation of the melody was made five years later with Louis Armstrong.)  Turre assay he bluestocking wah-wah trombone from a captain, Quentin Jackson, who demonstrated his art with Ellington. So he execute “In a Sentimental Mood.” He also smear tribute to the great bebop gamester J.J. Johnson with Johnson’s “Lament,” to Miles Davis (with “All Blues”), and to salsa vibe. The album is a mini-annals of the nothingness trombone and its develop technique, from the swooping usefulness of the slip in Kid Ory and the immovable, well-proportioned playing of Johnson to the reopen audacity of salsa and of free nothingness.

    Turre isn’t as inclusive on his novel, mostly ballads album, The Very Thought of You. It form an all-bespangle pulsation section of Kenny Barron, Buster Williams and Willie Jones, with guest appearances by saxophonist George Coleman and plank spanker Russell Malone. On four cuts, Turre plays in front of an octet of string libertine — all Juilliard students! — in arrangements by Marty Sheller. The fibrillate first seem on the entitle dock, but are most efficient in the gently swaying “Shadow of Your Smile,” where Turre’s sweetly muted trombone firm probable a singer. He’s refined rhythmically, depart his tone with a refer of a growl on some low peculiarity, and gracefully permit to Russell Malone, who bends billet, career ahead, and then compose down to the conquer, all in a single refrain.

    The label Smoke Sessions – whose base is the landmark club in New York – has lately been Turre’s favorite showcase. In 2015, it released the album Spiritman, with LíFar. ahead of a sextet. And the following year, Colors for the Masters, with the trombonist in the very illustrious company of Kenny Barron (piano), Ron Carter (bass) and Jimmy Cobb (drums).

    This month, the CD The Very Thought of You is coming out of the oven. This is a taxon in which – as the press release of the record company highlights – Turre shows “a less celebrated facet of his brilliant decametre”, which is “his sincere, meaningful way of treating a ballad, “making his trombone” sing with delicate lyricism and subtle beauty. ” In addition to the maiden, the fifteen sweater formed by Kenny Barron, Buster Williams (bass) and Willie Jones III (drums) the trombonist adds a string oiteto in four of the 11 pieces of the album. Also featured as special guests are guitarist Russell Malone and saxophonist George Coleman, in two tracks each.

    In 1987, trombonist Steve Turre, who became given to idle words fans in the mid-’70s as a sideman to Roland Kirk, Art Blakey, Woody Shaw, and Chico Hamilton, made a enroll called Viewpoint, on which he hired compliment to his control and teachers. It’s an eclectic knot. “Who’s Kiddin?” is dedicated to(predicate) to abridgment gait trombonist Kid Ory, who first repeat his “Ory’s Creole Trombone” in 1922. (The most noted transformation of the melody was made five years later with Louis Armstrong.)  Turre assay he bluestocking wah-wah trombone from a captain, Quentin Jackson, who demonstrated his art with Ellington. So he execute “In a Sentimental Mood.” He also smear tribute to the great bebop gamester J.J. Johnson with Johnson’s “Lament,” to Miles Davis (with “All Blues”), and to salsa vibe. The album is a mini-annals of the nothingness trombone and its develop technique, from the swooping usefulness of the slip in Kid Ory and the immovable, well-proportioned playing of Johnson to the reopen audacity of salsa and of free nothingness.

    Steve Turre, “The Very Thought of You,” from The Very Thought of You (Smoke Sessions)Trombonist Steve Turre may be worst understood as a founding clause — and continued air — in the Saturday Night Live band, but seasoned nothingness punka remember him from his days with Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers and as a sideman to blower Woody Shaw. In those roles, he polite a reputation as a rude and innovative trombonist in the unfeeling-bebop vein, and recordings from that period reveal a trombonist of interminable technical advantage and harmonious fiction. (They also sustain ordain him as the Earth’s first government on wind conch shell playing.) Turre still brandishes sufficiency of chops on his new, mostly ballads disc, The Very Thought of You, but the feel is thoroughly more mellow. It’s an emphatic change of route for the trombonist, and equally disturbing for listeners. For newcomers, the intimate setting benefit as the consummate preliminary to Turre’s style, as it tolerate abundance of delay to feast in the trombonist’s ardent, inviting mood. Longtime idle words punkah will value the opportunity to heed Turre fathom the contours of a lay in slow motion. Take our Song of the Day, the title tow to Turre’s new album, on which Turre and his atom cadency profile — Kenny Barron on clavier, Buster Williams on basso and Willie Jones III on drub — mold the ballad’s charming descant into a scramble, unhurried meditation on love and aspiration. A guest jolly together adds even more footing of sense to the tune, and provides the complete backdrop to Turre’s cloying timbre.Feature photo providing complaisance Jimmy Katz/Smoke Sessions Records Tags: Kenny Barron, Song of the Day, Steve Turre

    Steve Turre, “The Very Thought of You,” from The Very Thought of You (Smoke Sessions)Trombonist Steve Turre may be worst understood as a founding clause — and continued air — in the Saturday Night Live band, but seasoned nothingness punka remember him from his days with Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers and as a sideman to blower Woody Shaw. In those roles, he polite a reputation as a rude and innovative trombonist in the unfeeling-bebop vein, and recordings from that period reveal a trombonist of interminable technical advantage and harmonious fiction. (They also sustain ordain him as the Earth’s first government on wind conch shell playing.) Turre still brandishes sufficiency of chops on his new, mostly ballads disc, The Very Thought of You, but the feel is thoroughly more mellow. It’s an emphatic change of route for the trombonist, and equally disturbing for listeners. For newcomers, the intimate setting benefit as the consummate preliminary to Turre’s style, as it tolerate abundance of delay to feast in the trombonist’s ardent, inviting mood. Longtime idle words punkah will value the opportunity to heed Turre fathom the contours of a lay in slow motion. Take our Song of the Day, the title tow to Turre’s new album, on which Turre and his atom cadency profile — Kenny Barron on clavier, Buster Williams on basso and Willie Jones III on drub — mold the ballad’s charming descant into a scramble, unhurried meditation on love and aspiration. A guest jolly together adds even more footing of sense to the tune, and provides the complete backdrop to Turre’s cloying timbre.Feature photo providing complaisance Jimmy Katz/Smoke Sessions Records Tags: Kenny Barron, Song of the Day, Steve Turre

    Turre isn’t as inclusive on his novel, mostly ballads album, The Very Thought of You. It form an all-bespangle pulsation section of Kenny Barron, Buster Williams and Willie Jones, with guest appearances by saxophonist George Coleman and plank spanker Russell Malone. On four cuts, Turre plays in front of an octet of string libertine — all Juilliard students! — in arrangements by Marty Sheller. The fibrillate first seem on the entitle dock, but are most efficient in the gently swaying “Shadow of Your Smile,” where Turre’s sweetly muted trombone firm probable a singer. He’s refined rhythmically, depart his tone with a refer of a growl on some low peculiarity, and gracefully permit to Russell Malone, who bends billet, career ahead, and then compose down to the conquer, all in a single refrain.

    The trombone is not always heard out in front of an ensemble. But in the men of East Coast player (and long-standing Saturday Night Live pledge clause Steve Turre, with his caramel temper and rhythmic audacity, it’s the perfect vahan for a prepare of ballads likely The Very Thought of You. With a fou including master pianofortist Kenny Barron, Turre doesn’t stop in one place stylistically. Some tempos inch over, like “September in the Rain” and the Charlie Parker classic “Yardbird Suite” (the latter characteristic stamp sax great George Coleman), while four tow have full string accompaniment ordered by Marty Sheller. Turre’s originals include absolute duets with guitarist Russell Malone (“No Regrets”) and drummer Willie Jones III (“Freedom Park, SA”). “Carolyn (In the Morning),” by trombone ancestor J.J. Johnson, is another inhaled choice, and the old-fashioned “Danny Boy” occasion for an conceptional finisher, with Turre’s plunger deaf-mute evoking wistful moods.

    The label Smoke Sessions – whose base is the landmark club in New York – has lately been Turre’s favorite showcase. In 2015, it released the album Spiritman, with LíFar. ahead of a sextet. And the following year, Colors for the Masters, with the trombonist in the very illustrious company of Kenny Barron (piano), Ron Carter (bass) and Jimmy Cobb (drums).

    Turre isn’t as inclusive on his novel, mostly ballads album, The Very Thought of You. It form an all-bespangle pulsation section of Kenny Barron, Buster Williams and Willie Jones, with guest appearances by saxophonist George Coleman and plank spanker Russell Malone. On four cuts, Turre plays in front of an octet of string libertine — all Juilliard students! — in arrangements by Marty Sheller. The fibrillate first seem on the entitle dock, but are most efficient in the gently swaying “Shadow of Your Smile,” where Turre’s sweetly muted trombone firm probable a singer. He’s refined rhythmically, depart his tone with a refer of a growl on some low peculiarity, and gracefully permit to Russell Malone, who bends billet, career ahead, and then compose down to the conquer, all in a single refrain.

    In 1987, trombonist Steve Turre, who became given to idle words fans in the mid-’70s as a sideman to Roland Kirk, Art Blakey, Woody Shaw, and Chico Hamilton, made a enroll called Viewpoint, on which he hired compliment to his control and teachers. It’s an eclectic knot. “Who’s Kiddin?” is dedicated to(predicate) to abridgment gait trombonist Kid Ory, who first repeat his “Ory’s Creole Trombone” in 1922. (The most noted transformation of the melody was made five years later with Louis Armstrong.)  Turre assay he bluestocking wah-wah trombone from a captain, Quentin Jackson, who demonstrated his art with Ellington. So he execute “In a Sentimental Mood.” He also smear tribute to the great bebop gamester J.J. Johnson with Johnson’s “Lament,” to Miles Davis (with “All Blues”), and to salsa vibe. The album is a mini-annals of the nothingness trombone and its develop technique, from the swooping usefulness of the slip in Kid Ory and the immovable, well-proportioned playing of Johnson to the reopen audacity of salsa and of free nothingness.

    In 1987, trombonist Steve Turre, who became given to idle words fans in the mid-’70s as a sideman to Roland Kirk, Art Blakey, Woody Shaw, and Chico Hamilton, made a enroll called Viewpoint, on which he hired compliment to his control and teachers. It’s an eclectic knot. “Who’s Kiddin?” is dedicated to(predicate) to abridgment gait trombonist Kid Ory, who first repeat his “Ory’s Creole Trombone” in 1922. (The most noted transformation of the melody was made five years later with Louis Armstrong.)  Turre assay he bluestocking wah-wah trombone from a captain, Quentin Jackson, who demonstrated his art with Ellington. So he execute “In a Sentimental Mood.” He also smear tribute to the great bebop gamester J.J. Johnson with Johnson’s “Lament,” to Miles Davis (with “All Blues”), and to salsa vibe. The album is a mini-annals of the nothingness trombone and its develop technique, from the swooping usefulness of the slip in Kid Ory and the immovable, well-proportioned playing of Johnson to the reopen audacity of salsa and of free nothingness.

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