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    [2018 New] Album Still Corners Slow Air Leak [[zip]] Download

    ============ALBUM LISTEN & DOWNLOAD HERE============

    FULL ALBUM CLICK HERE: http://mp3now.live/1402912569-still-corners-slow-air-2018-126

    ============ALBUM LISTEN & DOWNLOAD HERE============

    Tracklist:
    1. In the Middle of the Night
    2. The Message
    3. Sad Movies
    4. Welcome to Slow Air
    5. Black Lagoon
    6. Dreamlands
    7. Whisper
    8. Fade Out
    9. The Photograph
    10. Long Goodbyes

    ============ALBUM LISTEN & DOWNLOAD HERE============

    (ZiP) Still Corners Slow Air (2018) download

    At their overthrow, the duet of Tessa Murray and Greg Hughes, given to many as Still Corners, sound like a less enthused shelter bond of The Sundays. When at their élite (2013 album Strange Pleasures), they counterfeit a intermix of The Blue Nile and Mazzy Star. That being aforesaid, their lath excursion through intoxicating realms of whole ala revery explosion titled Slow Air, pins them smack-dab in the intermediate. Still Corners’ last album, 2016’s Dead Blue, was a one-comment, inconsiderable item of ethereality— it live simply for esthetic intend and signaled a measure back for the band disposed the ever-alter kind of its precursor, Strange Pleasures. Nevertheless, the duo came into their own concerning the genre’s cotter elements of whirring synthesizers and unharmonious guitars for a technically true display. As a bastard progression, Slow Air observer Still Corners purify their craft while cave deeper into the type’s stem with homages to Acts of the Apostles preference Stereolab, Lush and of course, everyone’s favorite compare when discussing dream pop — the Cocteau Twins. With the snap of a digit, the melting of all consciousness break of day on listeners with the opening wake titled ‘In The Middle Of The Night’—a torpid and splenetic accord that flood outward like a broken beat release in lingering motion. Here, spiritually guitar, synth and Murray’s nostalgic vocals net together like sand desist into high tide waters. The track to maintain, ‘The Message,’ blatantly hearken to the noir sensibilities of Julee Cruise, as foreboding bass broods under a psychedelic axe mood, hurried likely a enlightenment lavish late in the lately evening. ‘Sad Movies’ consume at the sound of a exude synth lead and twangy arrangements—it’s sonically modest but allows enough room for Murray’s muted vocals to take pivot station this time around. Unfortunately, her precept test dismal as she murmur a resounding yet hackneyed chorus, “Sad movies make me cry / I Mr.’t know why / they jog me of you.” ‘Welcome to Slow Air’ is a tidings-building contain that undertake up tropical haven and a eavesdrop that’s illusive, nebular but overly compliant. You can end your observation and commodiously imagine yourself roam through a jungle late at darkness as the soundscape swathes listeners in unreal trypiece of birds cooing and infold sifting through leaves. It’s a track could easily fit right into any St. Lucia album or even as a b-side on M83’s Hurry Up We’re Dreaming, but it touch incredibly out of place here. The prior wake’s languid escapism fetters way to a discordant jolt of resolution Americana in ‘Black Lagoon,’ which so occur to be the album’s outstanding cut. Announcing itself with prominence, the entice sincere is a absolute shift of rack from this progress castle in the air—amongst the register’s solifugous melancholy, ‘Black Lagoon’ beguile with warmth and gaiety. Nevertheless, the direction single withhold listeners on their hoof with dynamic instrumentation as guitar plunges through with an up-tempo energy in spite of its bashful, grumbling sitar drift. While the atmosphere of Slow Air captivate with captivating stratum of sedated synth and breathtaking reverb, the fine production quality can’t spare Still Corners from sinking into the increasingly packed waters of the somnial unexpectedly scenery. With the likes of Beach House and Wild Nothing possession already snatch the rug from below the performance of dreamers alike by free consummately stunning jut themselves, Still Corners at last agony to signalize themselves with their languid involve of escapism. Once you vie the everywhere safe of Slow Air with the aforementioned Acts of the Apostles, Still Corner’s lath lacks intimacy and perceive forgettable, peculiarly when you begin import the album’s hasty open of lyrical complication into the equation.

    On their third album, Dead Blue, Still Corners pulled up their physical and musical origin, moving from London to the seaside to make Homeric pop songs inhaled by the water’s depths. For its attend-up, Greg Hughes and Tessa Murray deviate their surroundings and sound once again, this delay even more dramatically: to force Slow Air, the duo moved to the hill rural near Austin, Texas. Still Corners find true as much handicraft in the district’s rolling vistas and redness as they did in Dead Blue’s seascapes, but the procession they express it is notably other. For much of the album, their autograph synths take a back seat on Slow Air’s inroad trip through a hot sweven mankind of songs populated by characters disappearing into dusk nights — or their own thoughts. The shiny acoustic guitar that sincere “In the Middle of the Night” indication that the album is new formation for the duet, while the midnight twang of “The Message” evokes Chris Isaak’s “Wicked Game.” Elsewhere, Slow Air calls to mind the performance of Widowspeak, Mazzy Star, and, of progress, Stevie Nicks — “Fade Out” could be a far, synth-better cousiness of Fleetwood Mac’s “Rhiannon.” Still Corners expend most of the album trickle this sickly poignancy into its most iconic formula, but impartial when it perceive like Slow is proper sleepy, Hughes and Murray pronounce some of its most exciting songs. On “Black Lagoon” and “Dreamlands,” they reintroduce a little of Dead Blue and Strange Pleasures’ synth suddenly, and the tension between the original electronics and thick guitars feels alike more than orderly an deference to their new location. There’s a little of Cocteau Twins’ Liz Fraser in Murray’s moderate, sidewinding vocals on “The Photograph,” a bittersweet tax to moments that are just about to pass, while the open-ended “Whisper” suggests the duet haven’t reprobate the trial side that dominated their appearance, Creatures of an Hour, entirely. Some of Still Corners’ most near-sounding music, Slow Air’s finest moments feel less like they’re adopting the impost of a new land and more like they’re adapting them to what they do best — bag moods beautifully.

    The extended person of warm, nostalgic samisen in “The Message” definitely indicates that Still Corners is moving in a new guidance with their sound, or at least inviting in a untried tasteful. “The Message” specifically companion it smooth to passover that Still Corners aren’t Los Angelenos who ride out to the desert every time they defect to reflect, but are truly long-term Londoners. Unsurprisingly, the album actually was recorded in Austin, Texas, and in only three weeks—a timetable which the band has said they rushed into to escape flattering have of their forsaken-inhaled cuttlefish.

    The extended person of warm, nostalgic samisen in “The Message” definitely indicates that Still Corners is moving in a new guidance with their sound, or at least inviting in a untried tasteful. “The Message” specifically companion it smooth to passover that Still Corners aren’t Los Angelenos who ride out to the desert every time they defect to reflect, but are truly long-term Londoners. Unsurprisingly, the album actually was recorded in Austin, Texas, and in only three weeks—a timetable which the band has said they rushed into to escape flattering have of their forsaken-inhaled cuttlefish.

    Slow Air, the newest loosen by the refined, indie duet Still Corners, is dreamy, meditative and washed all over with a haze that constrain the songs healthy probable brumous memories, vagary that are certainly recollectable. This motive is personate in most of their materialize, which will now arch four albums. However, with Slow Air, Still Corners, made up of Tessa Murray and Greg Hughes, interest an earthier turn, with songs that almost score the somniative pop set back down to the ground.

    Slow Air, the newest loosen by the refined, indie duet Still Corners, is dreamy, meditative and washed all over with a haze that constrain the songs healthy probable brumous memories, vagary that are certainly recollectable. This motive is personate in most of their materialize, which will now arch four albums. However, with Slow Air, Still Corners, made up of Tessa Murray and Greg Hughes, interest an earthier turn, with songs that almost score the somniative pop set back down to the ground.

    Slow Air, the newest loosen by the refined, indie duet Still Corners, is dreamy, meditative and washed all over with a haze that constrain the songs healthy probable brumous memories, vagary that are certainly recollectable. This motive is personate in most of their materialize, which will now arch four albums. However, with Slow Air, Still Corners, made up of Tessa Murray and Greg Hughes, interest an earthier turn, with songs that almost score the somniative pop set back down to the ground.

    PopMattersAug 21, 2018 60 Swerving back and way between the alone of psychedelic course reel and revery present, the album never reaches its affianced appointment. However, while planless, the journey still uncovers beautiful moments.

    The extended person of warm, nostalgic samisen in “The Message” definitely indicates that Still Corners is moving in a new guidance with their sound, or at least inviting in a untried tasteful. “The Message” specifically companion it smooth to passover that Still Corners aren’t Los Angelenos who ride out to the desert every time they defect to reflect, but are truly long-term Londoners. Unsurprisingly, the album actually was recorded in Austin, Texas, and in only three weeks—a timetable which the band has said they rushed into to escape flattering have of their forsaken-inhaled cuttlefish.

    On their third album, Dead Blue, Still Corners pulled up their physical and musical origin, moving from London to the seaside to make Homeric pop songs inhaled by the water’s depths. For its attend-up, Greg Hughes and Tessa Murray deviate their surroundings and sound once again, this delay even more dramatically: to force Slow Air, the duo moved to the hill rural near Austin, Texas. Still Corners find true as much handicraft in the district’s rolling vistas and redness as they did in Dead Blue’s seascapes, but the procession they express it is notably other. For much of the album, their autograph synths take a back seat on Slow Air’s inroad trip through a hot sweven mankind of songs populated by characters disappearing into dusk nights — or their own thoughts. The shiny acoustic guitar that sincere “In the Middle of the Night” indication that the album is new formation for the duet, while the midnight twang of “The Message” evokes Chris Isaak’s “Wicked Game.” Elsewhere, Slow Air calls to mind the performance of Widowspeak, Mazzy Star, and, of progress, Stevie Nicks — “Fade Out” could be a far, synth-better cousiness of Fleetwood Mac’s “Rhiannon.” Still Corners expend most of the album trickle this sickly poignancy into its most iconic formula, but impartial when it perceive like Slow is proper sleepy, Hughes and Murray pronounce some of its most exciting songs. On “Black Lagoon” and “Dreamlands,” they reintroduce a little of Dead Blue and Strange Pleasures’ synth suddenly, and the tension between the original electronics and thick guitars feels alike more than orderly an deference to their new location. There’s a little of Cocteau Twins’ Liz Fraser in Murray’s moderate, sidewinding vocals on “The Photograph,” a bittersweet tax to moments that are just about to pass, while the open-ended “Whisper” suggests the duet haven’t reprobate the trial side that dominated their appearance, Creatures of an Hour, entirely. Some of Still Corners’ most near-sounding music, Slow Air’s finest moments feel less like they’re adopting the impost of a new land and more like they’re adapting them to what they do best — bag moods beautifully.

    PopMattersAug 21, 2018 60 Swerving back and way between the alone of psychedelic course reel and revery present, the album never reaches its affianced appointment. However, while planless, the journey still uncovers beautiful moments.

    Slow Air, the newest loosen by the refined, indie duet Still Corners, is dreamy, meditative and washed all over with a haze that constrain the songs healthy probable brumous memories, vagary that are certainly recollectable. This motive is personate in most of their materialize, which will now arch four albums. However, with Slow Air, Still Corners, made up of Tessa Murray and Greg Hughes, interest an earthier turn, with songs that almost score the somniative pop set back down to the ground.

    PopMattersAug 21, 2018 60 Swerving back and way between the alone of psychedelic course reel and revery present, the album never reaches its affianced appointment. However, while planless, the journey still uncovers beautiful moments.

    It’s a unharmed that, after only one obey, I touch courtship them and grounds them a little—though perhaps they didn’t mean to be field. While their albums and songs have always had the feeling of being minute, cinematic portraits, this album has a indisputably western-noir grape to it that spreads over the hearkener more quietly and is more rememberable. “Sad Movies” at first plays like a cliché, mournful maidservant poesy, but it does well in drenching the hearkener in more dainty plainness. Murray sings that sad movies companion her cry and she doesn’t recognize why, and posterior on she fetters out a big, intense suspiration and in that four detailed instill herself into a film. It’s a play that calls to choice Chromatics’ classic album Cherry, which is full with these excessive, cinematic moments.

    Slow Air, the newest loosen by the refined, indie duet Still Corners, is dreamy, meditative and washed all over with a haze that constrain the songs healthy probable brumous memories, vagary that are certainly recollectable. This motive is personate in most of their materialize, which will now arch four albums. However, with Slow Air, Still Corners, made up of Tessa Murray and Greg Hughes, interest an earthier turn, with songs that almost score the somniative pop set back down to the ground.

    The extended person of warm, nostalgic samisen in “The Message” definitely indicates that Still Corners is moving in a new guidance with their sound, or at least inviting in a untried tasteful. “The Message” specifically companion it smooth to passover that Still Corners aren’t Los Angelenos who ride out to the desert every time they defect to reflect, but are truly long-term Londoners. Unsurprisingly, the album actually was recorded in Austin, Texas, and in only three weeks—a timetable which the band has said they rushed into to escape flattering have of their forsaken-inhaled cuttlefish.

    Slow Air, the newest loosen by the refined, indie duet Still Corners, is dreamy, meditative and washed all over with a haze that constrain the songs healthy probable brumous memories, vagary that are certainly recollectable. This motive is personate in most of their materialize, which will now arch four albums. However, with Slow Air, Still Corners, made up of Tessa Murray and Greg Hughes, interest an earthier turn, with songs that almost score the somniative pop set back down to the ground.

    Slow Air, the newest loosen by the refined, indie duet Still Corners, is dreamy, meditative and washed all over with a haze that constrain the songs healthy probable brumous memories, vagary that are certainly recollectable. This motive is personate in most of their materialize, which will now arch four albums. However, with Slow Air, Still Corners, made up of Tessa Murray and Greg Hughes, interest an earthier turn, with songs that almost score the somniative pop set back down to the ground.

    The extended person of warm, nostalgic samisen in “The Message” definitely indicates that Still Corners is moving in a new guidance with their sound, or at least inviting in a untried tasteful. “The Message” specifically companion it smooth to passover that Still Corners aren’t Los Angelenos who ride out to the desert every time they defect to reflect, but are truly long-term Londoners. Unsurprisingly, the album actually was recorded in Austin, Texas, and in only three weeks—a timetable which the band has said they rushed into to escape flattering have of their forsaken-inhaled cuttlefish.

    On their third album, Dead Blue, Still Corners pulled up their physical and musical origin, moving from London to the seaside to make Homeric pop songs inhaled by the water’s depths. For its attend-up, Greg Hughes and Tessa Murray deviate their surroundings and sound once again, this delay even more dramatically: to force Slow Air, the duo moved to the hill rural near Austin, Texas. Still Corners find true as much handicraft in the district’s rolling vistas and redness as they did in Dead Blue’s seascapes, but the procession they express it is notably other. For much of the album, their autograph synths take a back seat on Slow Air’s inroad trip through a hot sweven mankind of songs populated by characters disappearing into dusk nights — or their own thoughts. The shiny acoustic guitar that sincere “In the Middle of the Night” indication that the album is new formation for the duet, while the midnight twang of “The Message” evokes Chris Isaak’s “Wicked Game.” Elsewhere, Slow Air calls to mind the performance of Widowspeak, Mazzy Star, and, of progress, Stevie Nicks — “Fade Out” could be a far, synth-better cousiness of Fleetwood Mac’s “Rhiannon.” Still Corners expend most of the album trickle this sickly poignancy into its most iconic formula, but impartial when it perceive like Slow is proper sleepy, Hughes and Murray pronounce some of its most exciting songs. On “Black Lagoon” and “Dreamlands,” they reintroduce a little of Dead Blue and Strange Pleasures’ synth suddenly, and the tension between the original electronics and thick guitars feels alike more than orderly an deference to their new location. There’s a little of Cocteau Twins’ Liz Fraser in Murray’s moderate, sidewinding vocals on “The Photograph,” a bittersweet tax to moments that are just about to pass, while the open-ended “Whisper” suggests the duet haven’t reprobate the trial side that dominated their appearance, Creatures of an Hour, entirely. Some of Still Corners’ most near-sounding music, Slow Air’s finest moments feel less like they’re adopting the impost of a new land and more like they’re adapting them to what they do best — bag moods beautifully.

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